Tag Archives: March on Washington

March on Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C. felt like a ghost town yesterday. Donald J. Trump became the 45th President of the United States of America yesterday, and the 92.8% of Washington, D.C. that voted for Hillary Clinton could not be found.

Today the city burst into a sea of pink, a vibe of feminism, and tsunami of liberalism. An estimated 500,000 people went to the National Mall, easily doubling Donald supporters’ presence the day before. What a difference a day makes.

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Photograph by author. January21, 2017

Nobody should be fooled; dark days are ahead. Traditionally strong alliances will be sorely tested. Canada and Mexico would suffer economically if Trump scraps NAFTA outright. Donald just last week lashed out at Angela Merkel’s refugee policy, which no doubt emboldens nationalists in Germany who want to keep Germany for themselves. If that makes people shudder from echoes of Germany’s not too recent past, it should. New alliances with unsavory characters like Russia’s Vladimir Putin will likely be forged in a mutual pursuit of petrodollars and utter contempt of criticism. On the domestic side, a newly constructed wall and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) appear to be the priorities for the administration. An ultraconservative Supreme Court nominee is in the works, and whose decisions will try to place the brakes on an increasingly-progressive America.

Today the city bled pink, and cities all over the United States of America did the same. It is reassuring to find Americans uniting around a common set of progressive ideas, and uplifting to find Americans rejecting the newly minted President Trump not through hate, but by bonding with love. President Trump may have won the election, but he lost the popular vote, and he sure did not win the hearts and minds of the majority of Americans.

Once again there is hope. Not because the road is short, or easy, or at times outright terrifying. Rather, there is hope because my fellow Americans will stand up for what is right. Today is the start of the resistance. Today is a reminder that love trumps hate.

Donald, good luck enacting your agenda. For come tomorrow, we are here to stop you.

Politico provided the information on Merkel and voting data for Washington, DC

 

 

 

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Reflecting on Today’s March on Washington

Today’s March on Washington, a March to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s historic civil rights speech before a segregated nation, did not disappoint.  Amongst the people in attendance included Oprah, Dr. King’s sister, and Presidents Obama, Clinton, and Carter.  

 

Notables absent from the event included the other two living presidents, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush, which struck me as much as anything else today.  Granted, George Sr. is frail and George Jr. is recovering from a heart operation.  But the symbolism that the only two living Republican presidents remained absent from the March speaks volumes about where the Republican Party today is on critical issues like voting rights, gun control, economic policy, immigration reform, and LGBTQ rights.  Perhaps that is why Republicans Cantor and Boehner turned down their invitations to speak at the event.  

 

And it is not only the Republican Party’s absence from the March on Washington 50 years on, but the fact that so many in the Republican Party work to actively dismantle that spirit of compromise.  No wonder the best line came from President Bill Clinton, who noted that there is something seriously wrong with this democracy when it is easier to purchase a gun than it is to vote.

 

On a day when Presidents Obama, Clinton, and Carter spoke so eloquently on how far we have come and how much farther we have to go, Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator and figurehead of the Republican Party some 150 years ago, presided over and watched silently on during today’s proceedings.  

 

By contrast, those who symbolize the Republican Party of 2013 chose to simply be silent.

 

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Picture credit goes to Wikipedia